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Can Izzet Phoenix Survive Rotation Into Throne of Eldraine Standard?

Yes, the blog that was founded on “not caring about Standard” now cares about Standard rotation. (Blame Magic Arena.)

Truly, the end times are here … but not for Izzet Phoenix. Read on to see how I think my favorite Standard deck will survive rotation into Throne of Eldraine season Standard.

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Was Gonna Write a Real Post, But Spent All My Time Playing Izzet Phoenix Instead

I’m in the midst of writing a lengthy post on how to manage Magic‘s bonkers-fast release schedule on a budget. I promise. However, “researching” that post required me to dive back in to Magic Arena, and I have yet to find my way out.

Reader, I’ve fallen in love with the latest version of Izzet Phoenix.

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I’m Already Sick of Bant Nexus

Which means Magic Arena is mostly successful!

Nexus of Fate Animation - Matt Plays Magic
This animation almost makes up for seeing a Nexus of Fate on the stack.
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Approach of the Second Sun Banner - Matt Plays Magic

UW Approach Deck Tech and Matches – Magic Arena

This week, it’s the return of videos, as we battle through a Magic Arena event with UW Approach of the Second Sun! Gain insight into Arena’s most eye-roll inducing deck and watch as we attempt to climb the prize payout ladder without casting a single creature.

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Scalding Tarn Price Graph Magic Finance - Matt Plays Magic

Magic Finance Is a Hard Sell

I had originally titled this article “Why I Don’t Play Standard,” but I think the new title sums up my reasons pretty succinctly. In case you skipped the title, I’ll reiterate:

It’s the Magic economy, stupid.

Magic finance is itself a game, one with much higher stakes than a typical Friday Night Magic tournament. Your typical FNM costs $5 to attend and pays $20-30 worth of prizes to first place. FNMs are a casual, low-cost way to spend an evening. Buying and selling the cards you use to play at those tournaments, however, is often a hundreds-of-dollars affair.

Not everyone can handle that price point or manage the ups and downs of Magic’s secondary market. I’m invested enough to write a bi-weekly blog about the game, and even I’m thrown by Magic’s price point and the expense of cards. I am absolutely sure that Magic’s status as a “Collectible Trading” card game puts players off the game because, at a certain level, I am one of those players who is put off.

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